Short History of Highway 63

Image and text from The History of Wisconsin’s Northwoods – 350 Years in the Seeley Hills by Jim Schirott. Reprinted with permission.

“Wisconsin Highway 24, now called U.S. Highway 63 is pictured running north through downtown Seeley around 1915.  Electric poles reflect the height of civility. On the left is the Uhrenholdt farm, which was located on the main road and remains the oldest standing building in the township.  This unpaved road was the only route to get from Hayward to Cable and points north…..”

A myth exists that Indians traveled the Namekagon only by canoe.  While, the Chippewa were adroit at the use of the canoe, other ancients had neither the boat building knowledge or seamanship abilities. Some were too old, including Chief Namekagon, and  walked the river’s edge.  North of Trego, all along the Namekagon River existed an ancient well used Indian path that was called the Stillwater Path….

The entire short history can be viewed via this download (requires Adobe Reader):
U.S. Route 63 History

If you have questions regarding area history, contact us at namekagon63@gmail.com and we’ll try to find an answer for you.

11-21-11 Work Session

The Steering Group will be meeting at the Seeley Sawmill Saloon on Monday, November 21 at 1:00pm for a work session to discuss organizational start-up tasks and  some early 2012 planning. You are invited to attend and participate.

Downloads below require free Adobe Reader (www.adobe.com)

Link to Steering Group documents
http://namekagon.org/?page_id=40

Work Session Agenda
NRP Steering Group Agenda 11-21-11

Work Session Minutes
Namekagon River Partnership Steering Group Minutes 11-21-11

Sigurd Olson – Sense of Place

“The Listening Post” article in the November-December issue of Minnesota Conservation Volunteer magazine has a Seeley connection.  It is available below, with permission from the publisher (requires Adobe Reader to download).

The Listening Post – Minnesota Conservation Volunteer – NovDec 2011

Or visit the Minnesota Conservation Volunteer website: www.mndnr.gov/magazine for this and other great conservation articles.